ACERCA DE RESALTAR INGREDIENTES EN EMPAQUES

ABOUT MAKING INGREDIENTS STAND OUT IN PACKAGING

¿Soy sólo yo, o hemos sido varios los diseñadores que hemos recibido briefs para el diseño de piezas de comunicación – llámense empaques, etiquetas, rompe tráficos, avisos, etc. – para productos de “alimentación” – sí, entre comillas –, donde se nos pide RESALTAR los “ingredientes” – sí, entre comillas – de los mismos y enseñarlos de la manera más apetitosa y natural posible? A juzgar por lo que veo a diario en los lineales y escaparates de supermercados y tiendas, diría que hemos sido varios, varios los que hemos sido parte de comunicaciones distorsionadas.

Is it just me, or we as designers have somewhere in our careers gotten briefs to design packs, labels, advertising material, etc. for the "food" industry – yes, between quotation marks –, where we're asked to make the product's "ingredients" – yes, between quotation marks again – STAND OUT and make them look as natural and appealing as possible? Well, judging by what I see every day in shelves at supermarkets and stores, I would say I'm not alone and I would say I've not been the only one who has been part of some shady communications.

Desde que empecé a meterme en el mundo del diseño de empaques, me volví quisquilloso con la comida. Nunca me había fijado en los textos legales de la parte posterior de los empaques hasta que tuve que diagramarlos, por lo que, hasta aquel momento, no me había tomado el trabajo de leer la lista de ingredientes de absolutamente nada de lo que consumía – y ya llevaba varios años haciendo mercado por mi cuenta. Le creía ciegamente a los frontales: si un sobre de sopa en polvo me decía “Sancocho” o “Ajiaco”, yo creía que, en efecto, se trataba de un sancocho o un ajiaco, sólo que deshidratado; y si una botella me decía “jugo de mango”, yo creía que se trataba de mango real licuado en agua con una cucharadita de azúcar, colado y embotellado.

Una vez me di cuenta que estos no eran los casos, comencé a investigar porque en muchos casos la lista de ingredientes incluía cosas con nombres extraños – e impronunciables a veces –o simplemente códigos alfanuméricos (E-321, E-600, etc.). Me enteré, así, que se trataba de aditivos, de origen tanto natural como artificial – aunque procesados químicamente al final de cuentas –, sustancias que se agregan a los alimentos por varias razones que van desde evitar la oxidación de otros ingredientes hasta mejorar las propiedades organolépticas del producto.

 

Ahora, ¿cuál es el problema con estos aditivos si su uso es permitido a nivel gubernamental – luego, inofensivos? Desde el punto de vista nutricional, no soy quien para explicarlo – dejémoslo en que prefiero consumirlos lo menos posible –, pero desde el punto de vista que me concierne profesionalmente, el de la comunicación visual, el lío radica en que, en muchísimos casos, estos aditivos constituyen gran parte del contenido del producto, incluso en cantidades mucho mayores a los ingredientes que se pide resaltar en las etiquetas, por lo general para diferenciar los sabores (Tip número 1: lo se porque los ingredientes siempre están listados en orden de mayor a menor cantidad).

En este orden de ideas, ¿qué se supone que debo resaltar y enseñar de manera natural y apetitosa? ¿Un montón de papas recién lavadas y cortadas o un montículo de almidón de maíz modificado (en el caso de una sopa)? ¿Un mango maduro o un bowl de azúcar (en el caso de un jugo)? ¿Un chorro de leche o trozos de grasa vegetal hidrolizada (en el caso de un helado)? ¿Cómo se verían las etiquetas de este tipo de productos si los ingredientes RESALTADOS de manera apetitosa fueran de los primeros que aparecen en la lista de la parte posterior del empaque? Bueno, por fortuna tengo las herramientas para hacerlo – y, aparentemente, tiempo de sobra – y es así como me los imagino (ver imágenes).

Ever since I started getting involved with packaging design, I became picky with food. Never had I stopped to look at the back of the packs in order to read the boring information that nobody reads, nor had I taken the time to analyze what was inside of what I was consuming – and I had been doing groceries for several years at that time –, until I had to lay it out. I trusted labels' front panels blindly, so if a soup sachet said "chicken soup" or "mushrooms soup", I would believe indeed that I was looking at a soup made out of chicken or mushrooms – only dehydrated –, and if I saw a bottle with a label that said "mango juice", I would actually believe that it contained real mangoes blended into water with a teaspoon of sugar – tops.

Once I realized that these were not the cases – at all! –, I started digging into it because there were usually listed ingredients whose names were absolutely impossible to pronounce, or even named with codes like E-321, E-600, etc. I found out that those weird listed ingredients were called additives, substances from both natural and artificial sources – although, both chemically processed, most likely – added to food products for a variety of reasons ranging from avoiding the oxidation of other ingredients to improving the product's organoleptic properties.

 

Now, what's the big deal about some stuff that's legally added – therefore, it must be harmless – to our food? Well, from a nutritional standpoint I'm no authority to discuss the subject – let's just say that I would rather not eat too much of this additive-loaded food –, but from my professional point of view as a graphic designer, I find it troubling that sometimes these additives constitute bigger portions of the whole thing than the ingredients that we're supposed to highlight in order to differentiate flavors, for example (Tip number 1: I know this because the ingredients in every food product are always listed in order of quantity, from higher to lower content).

This obviously raises some questions, like which ingredients am I supposed to highlight and show as natural and appealing as possible? Should it be a bunch of recently cleaned and chopped mushrooms or a bowl full of modified cornstarch (in the case of a soup)? Should it be a ripe mango or a bowl of sugar (in the case of a juice)? Milk splash or a bunch of chunks of partially-hydrogenated vegetable oil (in the case of ice cream)? How would these type of products' labels look like if the appealing ingredients depicted in the front were those that actually are listed first or second, or even third in the back? Well, fortunately I have the tools to do that – and apparently a lot of spare time – and this is how I've pictured some of them in my head every time I've had to listen to these briefs.

¿Qué pasaría si estos productos fueran de verdad honestos – ahora que todos parecen querer subirse en este bus, así no tengan con qué? ¿Y si los supuestos – y a veces mal llamados – beneficios fueran claims que hablasen de la verdadera naturaleza de sus contenidos? Nada de contar verdades a medias ya que es así como se dice que un producto “contiene ingredientes 100% naturales” y, pues, bajo esa lógica, el petróleo es un producto natural.

Creo que el diseño debería servir a las personas, y estas personas, que a diario llamamos “consumidores” o “target”, tienen derecho a estar al tanto de qué es lo que se les vende y con qué propósito. Desde la comunicación visual y el diseño se pueden influenciar las decisiones de compra y comportamientos de muchas personas, así como la cultura de sociedades enteras, por lo que este tipo de mensajes distorsionados – ¿cómo llamarían ustedes a un producto que muestra deliberadamente imágenes de ingredientes que ni siquiera contiene? – no deberían hacer parte de nuestro día a día. Como comunicadores o diseñadores, somos también consumidores y por esto cabría preguntarse si, en situaciones que no consideramos correctas, me hago el de las gafas, o me rehúso a contar mensajes distorsionados. Sólo una reflexión…

What would happen if these products were actually honest – now that everyone seems really eager to get into this trend no matter what? What if the so-called benefits that appear more and more in labels talked about the real nature of the product's content? When I say "real nature" I mean no half-truths and no bullshit because that's how we have products in our supermarkets that claim they only contain "natural ingredients" and, by that logic, even petroleum would constitute a natural ingredient.

I believe design should be focused on people, and these people we call "consumers" or "audience" everyday, should be entitled to know exactly what's being sold to them. Designers and visual communicators have the ability to influence purchase decisions and behaviors, and even cultural aspects of society, so this type of distorted messages – how would you call a product that deliberately depicts photos of ingredients that it doesn't even contain? – shouldn't be part of our everyday life. As designers, we're also consumers, and that's why, if we find ourselves in situations we feel morally uncomfortable with, we should try to think if we really want to turn a blind eye on this or take the courage to say no to telling distorted messages. Just something to ponder on...

juan josé montes

© 2017 Juan José Montes

ACERCA DE RESALTAR INGREDIENTES EN EMPAQUES

¿Soy sólo yo, o hemos sido varios los diseñadores que hemos recibido briefs para el diseño de piezas de comunicación – llámense empaques, etiquetas, rompe tráficos, avisos, etc. – para productos de “alimentación” – sí, entre comillas –, donde se nos pide RESALTAR los “ingredientes” – sí, entre comillas – de los mismos y enseñarlos de la manera más apetitosa y natural posible? A juzgar por lo que veo a diario en los lineales y escaparates de supermercados y tiendas, diría que hemos sido varios, varios los que hemos sido parte de comunicaciones distorsionadas.

Desde que empecé a meterme en el mundo del diseño de empaques, me volví quisquilloso con la comida. Nunca me había fijado en los textos legales de la parte posterior de los empaques hasta que tuve que diagramarlos, por lo que, hasta aquel momento, no me había tomado el trabajo de leer la lista de ingredientes de absolutamente nada de lo que consumía – y ya llevaba varios años haciendo mercado por mi cuenta. Le creía ciegamente a los frontales: si un sobre de sopa en polvo me decía “Sancocho” o “Ajiaco”, yo creía que, en efecto, se trataba de un sancocho o un ajiaco, sólo que deshidratado; y si una botella me decía “jugo de mango”, yo creía que se trataba de mango real licuado en agua con una cucharadita de azúcar, colado y embotellado.

Una vez me di cuenta que estos no eran los casos, comencé a investigar porque en muchos casos la lista de ingredientes incluía cosas con nombres extraños – e impronunciables a veces –o simplemente códigos alfanuméricos (E-321, E-600, etc.). Me enteré, así, que se trataba de aditivos, de origen tanto natural como artificial – aunque procesados químicamente al final de cuentas –, sustancias que se agregan a los alimentos por varias razones que van desde evitar la oxidación de otros ingredientes hasta mejorar las propiedades organolépticas del producto.

 

Ahora, ¿cuál es el problema con estos aditivos si su uso es permitido a nivel gubernamental – luego, inofensivos? Desde el punto de vista nutricional, no soy quien para explicarlo – dejémoslo en que prefiero consumirlos lo menos posible –, pero desde el punto de vista que me concierne profesionalmente, el de la comunicación visual, el lío radica en que, en muchísimos casos, estos aditivos constituyen gran parte del contenido del producto, incluso en cantidades mucho mayores a los ingredientes que se pide resaltar en las etiquetas, por lo general para diferenciar los sabores (Tip número 1: lo se porque los ingredientes siempre están listados en orden de mayor a menor cantidad).

En este orden de ideas, ¿qué se supone que debo resaltar y enseñar de manera natural y apetitosa? ¿Un montón de papas recién lavadas y cortadas o un montículo de almidón de maíz modificado (en el caso de una sopa)? ¿Un mango maduro o un bowl de azúcar (en el caso de un jugo)? ¿Un chorro de leche o trozos de grasa vegetal hidrolizada (en el caso de un helado)? ¿Cómo se verían las etiquetas de este tipo de productos si los ingredientes RESALTADOS de manera apetitosa fueran de los primeros que aparecen en la lista de la parte posterior del empaque? Bueno, por fortuna tengo las herramientas para hacerlo – y, aparentemente, tiempo de sobra – y es así como me los imagino (ver imágenes).

¿Qué pasaría si estos productos fueran de verdad honestos – ahora que todos parecen querer subirse en este bus, así no tengan con qué? ¿Y si los supuestos – y a veces mal llamados – beneficios fueran claims que hablasen de la verdadera naturaleza de sus contenidos? Nada de contar verdades a medias ya que es así como se dice que un producto “contiene ingredientes 100% naturales” y, pues, bajo esa lógica, el petróleo es un producto natural.

Creo que el diseño debería servir a las personas, y estas personas, que a diario llamamos “consumidores” o “target”, tienen derecho a estar al tanto de qué es lo que se les vende y con qué propósito. Desde la comunicación visual y el diseño se pueden influenciar las decisiones de compra y comportamientos de muchas personas, así como la cultura de sociedades enteras, por lo que este tipo de mensajes distorsionados – ¿cómo llamarían ustedes a un producto que muestra deliberadamente imágenes de ingredientes que ni siquiera contiene? – no deberían hacer parte de nuestro día a día. Como comunicadores o diseñadores, somos también consumidores y por esto cabría preguntarse si, en situaciones que no consideramos correctas, me hago el de las gafas, o me rehúso a contar mensajes distorsionados. Sólo una reflexión…